Natural hybridization between cultivated poplars and their wild relatives: evidence and consequences for native poplar populations

An Vanden Broeck, M Villar, E Van Bockstaele, Jos Van Slycken

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    Abstract

    It is recognized that introgressive hybridization and gene flow from domesticated species into their wild relatives can have a profound effect on the persistence and evolution of wild populations. Here, we review published literature and recent data concerning introgressive hybridization involving numerous species of the genus Populus. First, we briefly refer to some concepts and terminology before
    reviewing examples of natural and anthropogenic hybridization. Second, we examine whether natural genetic barriers could limit introgressive
    hybridization. Threat and possible consequences of anthropogenic hybridization are discussed in order to finally suggest conservation strategies for native poplar populations.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalAnnals of Forest Science
    Volume62
    Issue number7
    Pages (from-to)601-613
    Number of pages13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Thematic list

    • Species and biotopes

    EWI Biomedical sciences

    • B004-botany

    Taxonomic list

    • poplar (Populus spp.)

    Policy

    • biodiversity policy

    Geographic list

    • Europe

    Technological

    • genetic technologies

    Free keywords

    • hyberidisatie

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