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Towards a cumulative collision risk assessment of local and migrating birds in North Sea offshore wind farms

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Towards a cumulative collision risk assessment of local and migrating birds in North Sea offshore wind farms. / Brabant, Robin; Vanermen, Nicolas; Stienen, Eric; Degraer, Steven.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 756, 2015, blz. 63-74.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftA1: Web of Science-artikel

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@article{a2f381f5c6f5407397b9230be9f58312,
title = "Towards a cumulative collision risk assessment of local and migrating birds in North Sea offshore wind farms",
abstract = "Bird collision assessments are generally made at the scale of a single wind farm. While especially in offshore situations such assessments already hold several assumptions, even bigger challenges exist on estimating the cumulative impact ofmultiple wind farms and the impacts at population level. In this paper, the number of collision victims at Belgian offshore wind farms was estimated with a(theoretical) collision risk model based on technical turbine specifications, bird-related parameters and bird density data of both local seabirds and passerinemigrants. Bird density data were gathered by visual censuses and radar registrations. The outcome of the model was extrapolated to future development scenarios in the Belgian part of the North Sea and in the entire North Sea, and then further used for a preliminary assessment of the impact at population level for the species at risk. The results indicate that the cumulative impact of a realistic scenario of 10,000 turbines in the North Sea might have a significant negative effect at population level for lesser and great black-backed gull.We further show that during a single night of intense songbird migration, the number of collision victims among passerine migrants might be in the order ofmagnitude of several thousands in the entire North Sea. We argue that it is of great importance to further develop methods to quantify the uncertainties and tominimise the assumptions, in order to assure more reliable cumulative impact assessments.",
author = "Robin Brabant and Nicolas Vanermen and Eric Stienen and Steven Degraer",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1007/s10750-015-2224-2",
language = "English",
volume = "756",
pages = "63--74",
journal = "Hydrobiologia",
issn = "0018-8158",
publisher = "Springer Science+Business Media",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards a cumulative collision risk assessment of local and migrating birds in North Sea offshore wind farms

AU - Brabant, Robin

AU - Vanermen, Nicolas

AU - Stienen, Eric

AU - Degraer, Steven

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Bird collision assessments are generally made at the scale of a single wind farm. While especially in offshore situations such assessments already hold several assumptions, even bigger challenges exist on estimating the cumulative impact ofmultiple wind farms and the impacts at population level. In this paper, the number of collision victims at Belgian offshore wind farms was estimated with a(theoretical) collision risk model based on technical turbine specifications, bird-related parameters and bird density data of both local seabirds and passerinemigrants. Bird density data were gathered by visual censuses and radar registrations. The outcome of the model was extrapolated to future development scenarios in the Belgian part of the North Sea and in the entire North Sea, and then further used for a preliminary assessment of the impact at population level for the species at risk. The results indicate that the cumulative impact of a realistic scenario of 10,000 turbines in the North Sea might have a significant negative effect at population level for lesser and great black-backed gull.We further show that during a single night of intense songbird migration, the number of collision victims among passerine migrants might be in the order ofmagnitude of several thousands in the entire North Sea. We argue that it is of great importance to further develop methods to quantify the uncertainties and tominimise the assumptions, in order to assure more reliable cumulative impact assessments.

AB - Bird collision assessments are generally made at the scale of a single wind farm. While especially in offshore situations such assessments already hold several assumptions, even bigger challenges exist on estimating the cumulative impact ofmultiple wind farms and the impacts at population level. In this paper, the number of collision victims at Belgian offshore wind farms was estimated with a(theoretical) collision risk model based on technical turbine specifications, bird-related parameters and bird density data of both local seabirds and passerinemigrants. Bird density data were gathered by visual censuses and radar registrations. The outcome of the model was extrapolated to future development scenarios in the Belgian part of the North Sea and in the entire North Sea, and then further used for a preliminary assessment of the impact at population level for the species at risk. The results indicate that the cumulative impact of a realistic scenario of 10,000 turbines in the North Sea might have a significant negative effect at population level for lesser and great black-backed gull.We further show that during a single night of intense songbird migration, the number of collision victims among passerine migrants might be in the order ofmagnitude of several thousands in the entire North Sea. We argue that it is of great importance to further develop methods to quantify the uncertainties and tominimise the assumptions, in order to assure more reliable cumulative impact assessments.

U2 - 10.1007/s10750-015-2224-2

DO - 10.1007/s10750-015-2224-2

M3 - A1: Web of Science-article

VL - 756

SP - 63

EP - 74

JO - Hydrobiologia

JF - Hydrobiologia

SN - 0018-8158

ER -

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